Visite também Portfolios

terça-feira, 29 junho 2021 14:39

Concerto a 3 Violini Concertato

Miguel Henriques

Additional Info

  • Intérprete: Camerata Gareguin Aroutiounian
  • Instrumento / Área: String Orchestra/Orquestra de Cordas
  • Programa:

    J. S. Bach Concerto a 3 violini concertato, 2 Violini, Viola, Basso continuo, BWV 1064R

    Camerata Gareguin Aroutiounian from ESML, January 2020, Peniche Church

     

    Editorial Notes/Notas editoriais
    Miguel Henriques

     

  • Partitura: Partitura - Concerto a 3 violini concertato
  • Media:

  • English Version:

    Concerto a 3 Violini Concertato

Concerto a 3 Violini Concertato

Origins

The production of concertato style works by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) experienced a particular development during the period in which he returned to Weimar in the years 1708-17, where he came into contact with several concertos by other composers, especially Italian ones, such as Antonio Vivaldi, Arcangelo Corelli, Tomaso Albinoni and Giuseppe Torelli, works that he studied, copied, and transcribed multiple times. However, references to Bach's concertos for multiple soloists coincide in setting the 1730s[1] as the probable date for the writing of this piece, a period in which the composer already assumed the post of Thomaskantor[2] (1723-50) in Leipzig.

The present edition of this Concerto by Johann Sebastian Bach aims not so much at an alleged and precise reconstruction of the original, but rather at a version plausibly close to the one supposedly lost, that was written in the key of D major for a concertino of three violins, which would have served as the basis for the Concerto in C major for three harpsichords and string ripieno BWV 1064 (3Cbl). Also, from the three harpsichords version survived only copies of the original manuscript.[3]

Unlike the options of some edited reconstruction attempts, this edition does not adopt ​​any simplification, reduction or thinness of the original counterpoint lines set for the three harpsichords. Rather, it takes as a basis all the material created and enunciated by the composer for the two hands of the three harpsichordists in this original version.

The presumption of the probable origin of the work having been a version for three violins has been consensually assumed by different musicologists. According to some, the Concerto was written for the purpose of being presented at the Zimmermannsches Kafeehaus in Leipzig, where the Leipziger Collegium Musicum — directed by J. S. Bach — gave regular concerts, considered as high-level artistic events, inviting many renowned artists to participate. On the Netherlands Bach Society's website, harpsichordist Lars Ulrik Mortensen says he considers this Concerto as most interesting: “It's such a rich piece that I could work on it for a long time. It's more cohesive and contains more dialogue than any other of Bach's Concertos.”[4]

About this original version for 3 harpsichords, one can read:

The harpsichordists nearly always operate as a whole, even playing large parts the same in one hand or even both. Brief solo passages serve more as an effect. It is only in the closing movement that there is scope for true solos: first arpeggios, like in the ‘Brandenburg’ concerto no. 5, then a continuous bass line with jumpy accompaniment, and finally some dramatic chromaticism in the first keyboard. A return of the frivolous triplets brings this virtuoso party to a rather abrupt end. It is remarkable that there is no continuo in the first and third movement; only a ‘bare’ bass line - which is actually quite modern.[5]

 

According to musicologist Peter Wollny, Bach's Violin Concertos ensemble reveal a great deal of formal and stylistic variety. Considering that the three harpsichords Concerto BWV 1064 will be an arrangement of a three violins Concerto in D major, although lost, Wollny notes that the harpsichord parts of this version (3Cbl) often indicate traces of proper violin writing, which could confirm the existence of the supposed original for three violins. He comments:

In both versions the concerto is a work of tremendous density and almost symphonic dimensions. The three soloists, who are assigned difficult and sometimes highly virtuosic parts in the outer movements, already step forward in the ritornello of the first movement with a common obbligato part. In the central movement, the cantabile lines of the solo instruments unfold above an ostinato-like recurring bass motif, thus forming a tranquil antithesis to the complexity of the opening movement. The concluding movement harks back to the first in its textures; here the fugal ritornellos and the harmonically adventurous episodes are particularly noteworthy.[6]

 

In his program notes, Phillip Huscher describes:

The first movement (no tempo is indicated in Bach’s score) is built around recurring statements of the opening material — the so-called ritornello or refrain. But the miracle of this music, of course, is what Bach does between these pillars of sound — the ingenious flights of fancy and the increasingly prolonged excursions for the soloists that resemble grand improvisations on familiar themes. The central Adagio is an expansive aria for […] soloists, weaving 2 an intricate conversation over the simplest of accompaniments. The final Allegro is headlong, and, particularly in the interchange of all […] soloists, congenial and witty.[7]

 

Interpretative Analysis

This concerto follows the formal treatment of the concerto grosso in which the three soloists (1svln, 2svln, 3svln) form a small group — the so-called concertino — frequently playing simultaneously, dissociated from the larger group — the ripieno —, both in the ritornellos in tutti as well as in the sections where the lines of the soloists develop, sometimes doubled, and accompanied by the basso continuo. In this edition, the editor chose to attribute some of the relevant lines of the left hand of the harpsichordists of the 3Cbl version to the first viola (1vla) and to the basso continuo (B.C.), or to the ripieno violin, viola, or bass sections.

This consistent articulation of soloists with simultaneous lines in constant counterpoint, in exchange or imitation of themes and motifs, creates an intricate but fascinating interpretation challenge that requires a meticulous and judicious consideration of the comparative importance of all the material in order to allow the choice of the indispensable hierarchies, which change every moment, in a permanent melodic dialogue polyphony. In this polyphonic game, the soloists are often together playing in unison, or in parallel thirds/sixths or triads, producing harmonic textures of relevant density. Instead of the virtuosic individualization of the concertato style, the type of writing of the solo parts thus establishes an intense interaction similar to that of the string quartet or other small instrumental and vocal chamber formations. Even so, virtuosic individualization does occur in more or less prolonged segments.

 

I. Movement, without tempo indication

The first movement (untitled) begins with the first ritornello (mm. 1-9) in which the concertino (the three solo violins) presents a melodic theme in unison (RC, mm. 1-2), in the tonic, of repetitive and simple profile but with a striking rhythmic articulation. This theme, first presented by the concertino, displays characteristic traits of Italian style; this conviction, however, cannot be confirmed, as the possible source which might have inspired this Concerto has not yet been identified (eventually lost). The oldest known source, the manuscript copy written by Bach's student Johannes Agricola, does not include any reference to this eventual possibility.[8]

As counterpoint to this theme, Bach superimposes a countertheme (RR) on the ripieno (on the first violins – vln I) of a completely different profile, rhythmically very fluid, which includes a syncopation on its head that leads to a melismatic sequence with four sixteenth notes that soon change into three groups of ornamental triplets, concluding this theme with the usual cadential jumps, returning to the tonic. Accompanying the two themes, the basses present a descending line in steps of joint degrees (cell a).

 

image01

Example 1: I. movement, mm. 1-4, ritornello, RC, RR, cel. a, b, and c.[9]

 

In the hierarchy between these two themes, it is important to verify that the melodic register of the ripieno RR theme is higher than the RC theme of the soloists. This thematic confrontation has, of course, the purpose of enhancing the RR counter-theme with a more complex profile than the RC theme. Therefore, there is no justification for the shifting of the soloists’ theme to the upper octave included in some editions of the version for three violins of this Concerto, as it would result, precisely, in the opposite effect intended by the composer.

This double thematic set that fills the first two measures includes all the cell and motif material (RC, RR, a, b, c, d) that will be used and varied with inversions, reductions and retrogradations throughout this first movement. This block repeats immediately afterwards in the dominant (mm. 3-4), with a small change between the RR thematic line of the vln I section, now presented by the vln II. The concertino evolves in unison into a motivic development of sixteenth notes using cells of the themes (especially cell b and c), including other variations of other cells, while vln I and vln II, concluding with another thematic design in variation of the original RR motif (mm. 6-8).

 

image02

Example 2: I. movement, mm. 5-8.

 

Thus, in the ritornello, we have a first thematic part (mm. 1-2) that repeats in the dominant (mm. 3-4) and which resolves with a small development (mm. 5-9), drawing a harmonic arc that passes through the close keys, ending in a perfect cadence to the tonic (mm. 8-9), which opens to the first dialogue between the soloists.

In this first moment when the focus is attributed to the soloists’ dialogue, a short theme (CS1, mm. 9-10) appears in 1svln with a dotted rhythm and cells derived from the thematic material. But, surprisingly, the initial theme of the concertino RC reappears simultaneously, now on the ripieno, with the dynamic indication of piano, that is, accompanying the short theme (CS1) and counterthemes (CCS1) of the concertino. In measure 10, the editor includes the left-hand line of the second harpsichord of the 3Cbl version in the vla section.

 

image03

Example 3: I. movement, mm. 9-12, CS1, RC, ritornello.

 

In measures 11-4, the recurrence of the ritornello of the entire ensemble, with RR and RC in the tonic, appears interspersed between the entries of the concertino's CS1 theme, which presents the imitation of the lower fourth of CS1 and respective CCS1, curiously, with the simultaneous repetition of the RC, now also in the ripieno, in the dominant (mm. 13-14). In this edition, the left-hand line of the first and second harpsichords of the 3Cbl version is included in the first of the vln II section and in the first of the vla section.

 

image04

Example 4: I. movement, mm. 13-6.

 

Again, the primacy is given to soloistic speech, this time in a slightly longer segment (mm.15-20), with the three solo violins swapping sequences in parallel sixths that descend into thirds with cell b and cell d derived from the ritornello material (three eighth notes: two repeating the same note, followed by the jump of a descending fifth), joining the basso continuo in the accompaniment of the doubled sixteenth notes. In measures 17-18, cell d appears on the vln I section with the descending jump changed to a sixth, while the bass articulates a tonic pedal note in eighth octave jumps. Simultaneously, the three soloists join in unison on an identical design to measures 4-5, then adopting the exchange between themselves of cell d. The left hand sixteenth row of the first harpsichord of the 3Cbl version is here drawn by the vla section, while the left hand sixteenth row of the third harpsichord appears in the 2svln. This block of lively dialogue between soloists concludes in measures 20-1 with the cadence that modulates to the dominant.

 

image05

Example 5: I. movement, mm. 17-20.

 

In measures 21-9, a new segment of simultaneous soloist lines continues, in sixteenth notes textures, introduced by divergent scales that make a return to the tonic. This edition takes advantage of the left-hand scales of the second and third harpsichords of the 3Cbl version by including them on the first vla and the B.C.. There follows an exchange of variations of the first part of the CS1 theme between the soloists (mm. 22-4, CS1 var) punctuated with comments in vln I (motif e), while the basses repeat the head of the RC theme.

 

image06

Concerto for 3 violins BWV 1064R análise e performance half 25 8

 

Example 6: I. movement, mm. 21-8.

 

In the second half of measure 24 and measure 25, while 2svln and 3svln comment with fragments of ascending and descending scales, 1svln stands out, first, with a line of scale sequence (ab motif), developing then to a combination of scale fragments followed by sixth jumps (mm. 26-8, cells a and f), then returning to the descending sequences of cell b (m. 29), bringing the soloists and ripieno back to the first part of the ritornello in the tonic (mm. 30-1).

 

image07

Example 7: I. movement, mm. 29-32.

 

This quote immediately gives way to the continuation of the speech of the soloist first violin (mm. 31-9) in arpeggio sequences accompanied by a chromatic rise on the bass, and punctuated by the sharing of arpeggio fragments and virtuosic fragments in the other soloists (involving in this edition the first viola and the redistribution of the material among the three solo violins), in a harmonic arc that starts in D with a minor seventh, which resolves to the sub-dominant G, with the secondary dominant E that resolves to the dominant A in minor mode, and, maintaining this V-I pattern, goes to F sharp with minor seventh, resolving to B minor, then changing the pattern with G, A with minor seventh, which resolves to the tonic D, bending yet again to the secondary dominant that resolves to the dominant, in an anticipated preparation of the cadence that will make the ritornello return to the tonic (mm. 40-2).

 

image08a

image08b

image08c

Example 8: I. movement, mm. 33-43.

 

It should be noted that this ritornello adds a conclusive measure to its structure (m. 42), approaching the relative B minor, in a clear reduction of the contrapuntal density. This distension effect allows, precisely, a new phase of the soloists' interventions, creating greater clarity in the articulation between the new CS2 theme in the 2svln (mm. 43-4) and its counterpoint from the left-hand of the second harpsichord (3Cbl), CCS2, here placed on the 3svln, and the basso continuo line. This new series of dialogues between the soloists continues with the imitation at the upper fourth of the CS2 theme on the 1svln, accompanied by other secondary lines distributed by the other soloists, including, in this edition, the first vla, which draws the left-hand line of the second harpsichord (3Cbl). However, in measure 47, a break is introduced in the cycle of fifths, leading in the next measure to the approach of the theme CS2 in C sharp as dominant of F sharp minor, in the 3svln.

 

image09a

image09b

Example 9: I. movement, mm. 44-51.

 

This sequence is followed by a new series of imitations between the soloists of a new motif (ca) in which cell c (arpeggio fragment) and cell a (scale fragment) are associated, combined with the descent in long values ​​of the augmented cell a, accompanied by the basso continuo and small comments on the first and second violins. Simultaneously, the counterpoint line of left-hand sixteenth notes of the third and second harpsichord (3Cbl) is recovered in this edition, once again in the first vla (mm. 49-51), followed by the imitation in the bass line in measure 52, just like the 3Cbl version, which is in line with the editorial options for the distribution of the soloist counterpoint lines in addition to the concertino. This segment culminates with the three soloists in unison repeating in sequence of fifths the motif ac and the motif a (mm. 53-6). In this edition, it was decided to attribute to the 3svln the left-hand line of the first harpsichord (3Cbl).

 

image10

Example 10: I. movement, mm. 52-5.

 

In the segment of measures 57-64, thematic material appears in combination or alternately with free counterpoint in the concertino, mainly using cell a. First, the RC theme is presented in the dominant on the 1svln paired with the vln I and II, while the soloist theme CS1 reappears on the 2svln leading to the repetition of the same RC (mm. 59-60) in all the sections of ripieno, while in the concertino, the soloists exchange variations and imitations of already known motifs.

 

image11a

image11b

Example 11: I. movement, mm. 56-63.

 

In measure 61, these contrapuntal dialogues in the concertino lead to the theme RC in the tonic, now simultaneously in the concertino and ripieno. In the second half of measure 63, the variations in the concertino return, this time leading to a sequence consisting of a half note descent in joint degrees in the vln I (m. 65-8), while in the concertino, the 3svln reappears with the CS2 theme, while the other soloists draw comments with the motifs a and c.

 

image12a

image12b

Example 12: I. movement, mm. 64-71.

 

The RC theme returns in the sub-dominant in the 1svln and in the ripieno violin sections, in measure 70, together with the CS1 theme in the 3svln. From measure 72 to measure 78, the concertino evolves in a passage similar to the passage of measures 15-21, now ending in G, which is followed by a sequence (mm. 78-9) similar to measures 22-3.

 

image13a

image13b

Example 13: I. movement, mm. 72-9.

 

This recapitulation of material from previous segments continues with a sequence (mm. 80-91) that culminates in another progression (mm. 91-9) with the recurrence of the RC theme in the different lines, in counterpoint with a CRC countertheme and a bass accompaniment pattern that later would be known as basso Alberti.

 

image14a

image14b

image14c

image14d

image14e

Example 14: I. movement, mm. 80-99.

 

From the second half of measure 99 to measure 102, the sequence of measures 31-4 returns, followed by the recapitulation (mm. 102-7) of the sequence of measures 49-51 leading to a descending half notes chromatic line in the 1svln and in the vln I, descent which is interrupted in the G sharp diminished chord, from which the soloists, two by two, draw a series of descending virtuosic figurations (mm. 107-9) of diminution ornamental type, answered by V-I movements by the soloist not involved in the pair and by the ripieno.

 

image15a

image15b

image15c

Example 15: I. movement, mm. 100-11.

 

This sequence repeats the same way in the next four measures (109-12), increasing with tension with the concertino in unison, in sequences with cell a and the RR var motif from the left-hand line of the second harpsichord of the 3Cbl version, here attributed to the first vla, joining the entire concertino and ripieno in measure 114 with the motifs c and a.

 

image16a

image16b

Example 16: I. movement, mm. 112-9.

 

This culminating point prepared the arrival of a pedal note on the following measures (115-9) where the 1svln is responsible for maintaining the sixteenths’ line continuous until measure 120, where it resumes the RC var motif, while the pedal note dissipates.

 

image17

Example 17: I. movement, mm. 120-3.

 

In these 120-2 measures, the present edition includes on the vc section the left-hand line of the three harpsichords of the 3Cbl version. This sequence evolves with the 3svln with sixteenth notes patterns and the first and second solo violins with eighth notes cells derived from the RC theme head. The concertino soloists play together again with the first and third violins (mm. 125-127) paired to the sixth with diminished cells, while the second draws variations of the already known triadic cells, then alternating the pair with the second and third violins with the CS2 theme up to measure 132, where the dialogue between soloists ends with the cadence to the tonic for the return in full of the complete ritornello (mm. 133-41).

 

image18a

image18b

image18c

image18d

image18e

Example 18: I. movement, mm. 124-41.

 

II. Adagio

The second movement, Adagio, in B minor, begins with a thematic block (RT, mm. 1-4) in which all elements of the ripieno exchange dialogue with fragments of descending and ascending sixteenth-note scales, slurred every two notes (motifs a, a inv), and comments in eighth notes (a' motif) above a pattern on the bass line.

 

image19

Example 19: II. Adagio, mm. 1-3.

 

This pattern of the basses will be repeated eight times throughout this movement. It starts by opening to the dominant (motif b), then returning to the tonic, through a descending design of sixteenth notes (motif b’) grouped in three- and two-note slurs. With the cadence to B minor, the B.C. proceeds with motif b, following the entry of the concertino who comes up with a thematic idea in the 1svln (CS, m. 4) to which the 2svln (CS var, comp. 5) immediately responds with variations of the same idea, and to which the 3vln is added (CS var, m. 6), equally in variations of CS motif.

 

image20

Example 20: II. Adagio, mm. 4-6.

 

In this first moment, the concertino uses several motifs, some free, others derived from ripieno motifs, leading to the second entry of the ripieno’s initial thematic block RT (mm. 9-12), now in the relative major. In this harmonic context of D major, the concertino returns with new motivic variations, imitations, and counter-motifs (CS2, CS2 var, CCS2, CS2’, mm. 12-5), now in reverse order of entry (3svln, 2svln and 1svln), accompanied by the B.C. with the motif b. In the following measures, while the concertino continues the dialogues and motivic imitations (CS2’, CS3[10]), the ripieno returns with the bass line in B minor (mm. 15-8).

 

image21a

image21b

image21c

image21d

Example 21: II. Adagio, mm. 7-18.

 

After this confirmation of the tonic, the B.C. offers a broader harmonic framework for the concertino, presenting the inverted b motif (mm. 18-21). Simultaneously, the three solo violins widen the dialogue space with alternating imitations with the CS3 and CS2’ motifs, combined with yet another recurrence of the bass pattern (mm. 21-4), lead to the initial thematic block (mm. 24-7), now in F sharp minor.

 

image22a

image22b

Example 22: II. Adagio, mm. 19-24.

 

After this block, the concertino reappears, now in simultaneous parallel lines (CS4), recovering the sixteenth notes’ cells from motif a, intensifying the sense of tonal undefinition through the successive passage of diminished seventh harmonies (mm. 27-30).

 

image23a

image23b

Example 23: II. Adagio, mm. 25-30.

 

From measure 31 onwards, while the concertino continues the previous melodic and contrapuntal interaction, now in a sequence of the fifths’ cycle, the violins and violas of the ripieno join in unison, enunciating the first part of the bass line (mm. 31-3), culminating with the return of the basses with the second part of the descending sixteenth notes’ pattern, which ends in the G sharp diminished chord, over which the movement is interrupted with a short cadenza with a fermata (m. 36).

 

image24a

image24b

Example 24: II. Adagio, mm. 31-6.

 

In the next two measures, these interruptions follow each other, with the chords of E sharp diminished seventh and A sharp diminished seventh.

 

image25a

image25b

Example 25: II. Adagio, mm. 37-41.

 

Leaving this disruptive moment, the concertino returns to the alternating segments with the CS3 motif (as in measures 18-21), again closing the contrapuntal texture with imitations and the return of the CS1 and CS4 motifs, marking the cadence of the return to the tonic with the sequences of sixteenth notes of the basses (mm. 38-44), passing this conclusive speech, in full, to the ripieno which recapitulates the thematic block RT of the beginning of the Adagio (mm. 44-7).

 

image26a

image26b

Example 26: II. Adagio, mm. 42-7.

 

III. Allegro

In the initial thematic block of the third movement (ritornello), the distribution of the counterpoint lines uses multiple times the pairing between soloists and ripieno sections. The initial bass line begins in D, descending in joint degrees (motif a), a line particularly similar to that of the first movement. On this line, 2svln and vln II present the main theme, which is constituted by an undulating ascending line in joint degrees (motif b), while 3svln and vla launch a kind of countertheme (motif c) with a rhythm of quarter notes, opening with an ascending fourth, then followed by alternating eighth and quarter notes, in close dialogue with the a var motif on 1svln and vln I  (mm. 1-10).

 

image27a

image27b

image27c

Example 27: III. Allegro, mm. 1-12.

 

In the following measures, the concertino continues (CS1) with a sequence of virtuosic scales on 1svln, accompanied by 2svln, vla and B.C. with triadic designs, following a kind of "bridge" to the second entry of the thematic block in the dominant, in which it completely repeats the same sequence of motifs, changing, however, the lines that enunciate them, with the exception of the basses (mm. 14-23).

 

image28a

image28b

image28c

Example 28: III. Allegro, mm. 13-24.

 

The concertino proceeds with motivic variations and imitations (mm. 23-8, motifs CS2). The editor extended this interaction to the vla section, recovering the left-hand lines of the harpsichords from the 3Cbl version.

 

image29

Example 29: III. Allegro, mm. 25-8.

 

Suddenly, the second part of the thematic block returns (mm. 29-35), which leads to another entrance of the complete block in the tonic (mm. 35-42), but where the concertino and vln I section draw the motif b and b’ in unison, with the motif a on the basses. In this edition, the lower sixth doubling of motif b, as well as the motif c of the left hand of the harpsichord of the 3Cbl version was attributed to vla and vln II sections respectively (mm. 35-8).

 

image30a

image30b

image30c

Example 30: III. Allegro, mm. 29-40.

 

This moment of more compact tutti in the tonic is followed by a sequence of interventions by the soloists in alternating pairs with ascending lines of triplets, doubled to the tenth and the sixth (mm. 42-8, CS3), leading to the sub-dominant and continuing on a varied ritornello, in a more prolonged interaction between soloists accompanied by the ripieno (mm. 48-59), ending in the relative minor.

 

image31a

image31b

Example 31: III. Allegro, mm. 41-8.

 

From measure 59 onwards, 3svln develops a longer solo line (CS4), only accompanied by the basses, with sporadic harmonic chords from the other soloists.

 

image32a

image32b

Example 32: III. Allegro, mm. 57-64.

 

Recovering the harpsichord set from the 3Cbl version, this edition extends these chords notes to the ripieno sections and the remaining soloists (mm. 59-65). Meanwhile, the 3svln solo line becomes more virtuosic after measure 66 with fast sixteenth-note scales.

 

image33a

image33b

Example 33: III. Allegro, mm. 65-72.

 

Given the interest of the interactivity between this line and that of the harpsichord left-hand of the 3Cbl version, the editor attributed this equally virtuosic line to the 1vla (mm. 66-9). In measure 70, starting from B minor, the intervention of the soloist 3svln starts to focus on a harmonic sequence with the repetition of virtuosic patterns, accompanied by a long bass line in eighth notes (mm. 70-9), passing by F sharp minor, C sharp minor, F sharp with minor seventh, then following the cycle of fifths, ending on F sharp minor with the entry of the tutti thematic block, with motif a in the basses, motif b in the vla and 3svln (mm. 80-9). Similar to what happened in measures 35-42, this block is again followed by a passage in which the soloists double and imitate the ascending motif of triplets (CS3), in a modulatory transition that leads to the dominant of the original tonic (mm. 89-100).

 

image34

Example 34: III. Allegro, mm. 89-92.

 

Anticipating the approaching end of this movement, in measure 102, the concertino launches another prolonged virtuosic intervention by 2svln (CS5). Valuing once more the richness of the harmonic and contrapuntal texture of the 3Cbl version, in this edition, the equally virtuosic line of the harpsichord's left hand is drawn by the 3svln up to measure 110.

 

image35a

image35b

image35c

Example 35: III. Allegro, mm. 101-12.

 

From the measure 110 onwards, the soloist develops a modulatory tremolo, while the B.C. resumes the fast row of eighth notes that had accompanied the previous solo (m. 110-21), reaching the dominant pedal.

 

image36a

image36b

Example 36: III. Allegro, mm. 117-24.

 

Here, the soloist's line becomes more complex (mm. 121-6), concluding with the resuming tutti's dialogue, similar to what happened in measures 23-9.

 

image37

Example 37: III. Allegro, mm. 125-8.

 

However, from measure 132 onwards, a more complex exchange of thematic block lines can be observed, with the motif on vln I, 1svln, and 2svln with trills, and further diminished and inverted on vla. The b motif appears in the basses while the b’ motif appears on the vln II, 2svln and 1svln (mm. 132-41).

 

image38a

image38b

Example 38: III. Allegro, mm. 129-36.

 

Despite the accumulation of tension, surprisingly, a new virtuosic solo emerges, now in 1svln (CS6), now with a more assertive ripieno chords that herald the urgency of the movement’s concluding section.

 

image39a

image39b

image39c

Example 39: III. Allegro, mm. 141-52.

 

Reinforcing the richness of the concertino's texture, the editor distributed the material from the left-hand line of the harpsichord of the 3Cbl version to the remaining soloists (mm. 145-67). The solo evolves until the reaching of a dominant pedal in the basses, focusing now on eighth note arpeggios (mm. 162-8). After several alternations of scales and arpeggios in sixteenth and eighth notes, 1svln arrives at a cadenza (mm. 168-75) filled with arpeggios and sequences of eighth notes slurred two by two, in an accumulation of tensions that resolves with the recapitulation of the initial block returning to the tonic.

 

image40a

image40b

image40c

image40d

image40e

Example 40: III. Allegro, mm. 161-80.

 

As a final gesture, in measures 188-92, preceding the final chords, the soloists return with the triplets’ motif (CS3), underlining the complexity of this movement’s structure.

 

image41a

image41b

Example 41: III. Allegro, mm. 185-92.

 

As in the first movement, the textures of the tutti and concertino are deeply explored in terms of harmonic and contrapuntal density. The editor considers this an almost unique musical experience in the catalogue of Johann Sebastian Bach works. While in the 3Cbl version, it is sometimes difficult to achieve optimal transparency in this texture, in the case of the present edition for three solo violins, the conditions are met to achieve that transparency through meticulous analytical work that sustains the indispensable hierarchy between the different lines, which is the reason to make this more detailed analysis available to the interpreter. 

 

REFERENCES

[1] ELLER, Rudolf, HELLER, Karl, Johann Sebastian Bach, Neue Ausgabe Sämtlicher Werke, 1976 (see note 1), p. 61.

[2]Título atribuído ao director musical da escola da Igreja de São Tomás.

[3] BACH, Johann S., Konzert, C-Dur BWV 1064, D-B Am.B 68, manuscript copy by Bach’s pupil Johann Friedrich Agricola, Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin – Amalienbibliothek, accessed on February, 3, 2021, https://www.bach-digital.de/receive/BachDigitalSource_source_00000434, 2021.

[4] Netherlands Bach Society, «Bach’s most interesting concerto», in Concerto for three harpsichords in C major, site da NBS, 2018, https://www.bachvereniging.nl/en/bwv/bwv-1064/, accessed on February, 4, 2021.

[5] NBS, accessed on February 4, 2021.

[6]WOLLNY, Peter, «Violin Concertos», J. S. Bach Violin Concertos BWV 1041-1043, Concerto for three violins BWV 1064R, CD HMC902145, harmonia mundi, Freiburger Barockorchester, 2013.

[7]HUSCHER, Phillip, «Program Notes», Johann Sebastian Bach Concerto in C Major, BWV 1064 (arr. Koopman for flute, oboe, violin, and bassoon), Chicago Symphony Orchestra, 2006.

[8] ELLER, Rudolf, HELLER, Karl, Johann Sebastian Bach, Neue Ausgabe Sämtlicher Werke, 1976 (see note 1), p. 63.

[9]Legend: Themes – RC (ritornello-concertino), RR (ritornello-ripieno), RT (ritornelo-theme), CS (concertino-solos), CCS (contra-concertino solos).

[10] It is interesting to observe that this CS3 motive is directly related with the CS2 motive of the 1st movement.


 

Concerto a 3 Violini Concertato

Origens

 A produção de obras concertantes por Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) conheceu um desenvolvimento particular durante o período em que regressou a Weimar, nos anos 1708-17, onde tomou contacto, copiando e múltiplas vezes transcrevendo, vários concertos de outros compositores, sobretudo italianos, como Antonio Vivaldi, Arcangelo Corelli, Tomaso Albinoni e Giuseppe Torelli. Contudo, as referências aos concertos para múltiplos solistas coincidem em fixar a década de 30[11] em que o compositor já assumia o cargo de Thomaskantor[12] (1723-50), em Leipzig.

A presente edição deste Concerto de Johann Sebastian Bach tem como objectivo, não tanto uma pretensa e impossível reconstrução do original, mas antes uma versão plausivelmente próxima da que se encontra, supostamente, perdida, na tonalidade de Ré maior para um concertino de três violinos, a qual terá servido de base para o Concerto em Dó maior para três cravos e ripieno de cordas BWV 1064 (3Cbl), do qual sobreviveram apenas cópias do manuscrito original.[13]

Ao contrário das opções de algumas tentativas de reconstrução editadas, esta edição não adopta qualquer simplificação e rarefacção do conjunto das linhas de contraponto. Antes, assume como base todo o material criado e enunciado pelo compositor para as duas mãos dos três cravistas nesta versão original.

A presunção da origem provável da obra ter sido uma versão para três violinos tem sido assumida consensualmente pelos diferentes musicólogos. Segundo alguns, o Concerto terá sido escrito com o objectivo da sua apresentação no Zimmermannsches Kafeehaus,[14] em Leipzig, onde o Leipziger Collegium Musicum — dirigido por J. S. Bach — dava concertos regulares, convidando muitos notabilizados artistas a participar em eventos de alto nível artístico. Na página da internet da Netherlands Bach Society, o cravista Lars Ulrik Mortensen afirma considerar este Concerto como o mais interessante de Bach: “É uma peça tão rica que eu poderia trabalhar nela durante muito tempo. É mais coesa e contém mais diálogos do que qualquer outro dos Concertos de Bach”.[15]

Sobre esta versão original para 3 cravos, pode ler-se:

Os cravistas quase sempre actuam como um todo, até mesmo tocando longas partes da mesma maneira em uma mão ou mesmo em ambas. Breves passagens solo servem mais como efeito. É apenas em movimento conclusivo que há espaço para verdadeiros solos: primeiro, harpejos, como no concerto de "Brandenburg" n.º 5, em seguida, uma linha de baixo contínua com acompanhamento de saltos intervalares e, finalmente, algum cromatismo dramático no primeiro cravo. Um retorno das frívolas tercinas traz esta festa virtuosa a um fim bastante abrupto. De notar que não haja contínuo no primeiro e no terceiro andamento; apenas uma linha de baixo 'nua' - que na verdade é bastante moderna.[16]

 

Segundo o musicólogo Peter Wollny, o conjunto dos Concertos de violino de Bach revelam uma grande variedade formal e estilística. Considerando que o Concerto para 3 cravos BWV 1064 será um arranjo de um Concerto para 3 violinos em Ré maior, entretanto perdido, Wollny observa que as partes de cravo dessa versão (3Cbl) indiciam em muitos momentos traços de escrita própria para violino, o que poderia confirmar a existência do suposto original para três violinos. Refere ainda:

Em ambas as versões, o concerto é uma obra de enorme densidade e dimensões quase sinfónicas. Os três solistas, aos quais são atribuídas partes difíceis e às vezes altamente virtuosísticas nos andamentos externos, avançam logo no ritornelo do primeiro movimento com uma parte de obbligato comum. No andamento central, as linhas cantabile dos instrumentos solo desdobram-se por cima de um motivo recorrente semelhante a um ostinato no baixo, formando assim uma antítese tranquila à complexidade do andamento inicial. O andamento final remonta ao primeiro com as suas texturas; aqui os ritornelos em estilo fugato e os episódios harmonicamente aventurosos são particularmente notáveis.[17]

 

Nas suas notas de programa, Phillip Huscher descreve:

O primeiro andamento (nenhum tempo é indicado na partitura de Bach) é construído em torno de asserções recorrentes do material de abertura — o chamado ritornello ou refrão. Mas o milagre desta música é, evidentemente, o que Bach faz entre esses pilares de som — os voos engenhosos da fantasia e as excursões cada vez mais prolongadas dos solistas que se assemelham a grandes improvisações sobre temas familiares. O Adagio central é uma ária expansiva para os solistas […], tecendo uma conversa intrincada sobre os acompanhamentos mais simples. O Allegro final é precipitado, e particularmente na alternância de todos os […] solistas, agradável e espirituoso.[18]

 

Análise interpretativa

Este concerto segue o tratamento formal do concerto grosso no qual os três solistas (1svln, 2svln, 3svln) formam um pequeno grupo — o chamado concertino — tocando frequentemente em simultâneo, dissociado do ripieno, tanto nos ritornellos com o ripieno, como nas secções de desenvolvimento das linhas dos respectivos solos, os quais, por vezes, se apresentam dobrados, sendo acompanhados pelo basso continuo. Na presente edição, optou-se por atribuir algumas das linhas relevantes da mão esquerda dos solistas da versão para três cravos 3Cbl à primeira viola (1vla) e ao primeiro violoncelo que faz o basso continuo (B.C.), juntando estes dois solistas ao trio original. Esta articulação consistente dos solistas com linhas simultâneas em constante contraponto, troca ou imitação de temas e motivos, cria um fascinante desafio de interpretação que obriga a uma meticulosa e criteriosa ponderação da importância comparativa de todo o material de modo a permitir a escolha das indispensáveis hierarquias, as quais se alteram a cada momento, em permanente polifonia de diálogos melódicos. Neste jogo polifónico, é frequente a junção dos solistas em uníssono, ou em paralelismo de terceiras/sextas ou triádico, produzindo texturas harmónicas de densidade relevante. Em vez da individualização virtuosística do estilo concertato, o tipo de escrita das partes solistas estabelece assim uma intensa interacção semelhante à do quarteto de cordas ou de outras pequenas formações de câmara instrumentais e vocais. Mesmo assim, a individualização virtuosística também ocorre em segmentos mais ou menos prolongados.

 

I. Andamento, sem indicação de tempo

O primeiro andamento (sem título) inicia-se com o primeiro ritornello (comps. 1-9) em que o concertino (os três violinos solistas) apresenta um tema melódico (RC, comps. 1-2) em uníssono na tónica, de perfil repetitivo e articulação rítmica simples, mas marcante. Este tema, primeiramente apresentado pelo concertino, exibe um recorte muito característico ao estilo italiano; essa convicção, contudo, não foi possível confirmar por ainda não ter sido identificada a possível fonte (eventualmente perdida), que terá servido de inspiração para este Concerto de Bach, apesar da fonte mais antiga conhecida, a cópia do manuscrito escrita pelo aluno de Bach, Johannes Agricola, não incluir essa origem.[19]

Em contraponto a este tema, Bach faz sobrepor um contratema (RR) no ripieno (nos primeiros violinos – vln I) de perfil completamente diverso, ritmicamente muito fluido, que inclui à cabeça uma síncopa, a qual conduz a uma sequência melismática com quatro semicolcheias que logo se transformam em três grupos de tercinas de contorno ornamental, concluindo-se este tema com os habituais saltos cadenciais, regressando à tónica. Acompanhando os dois temas, os baixos apresentam uma linha descendente em passos de graus conjuntos (célula a).

 

image01

Exemplo 1: I. andamento, comps. 1-4, ritornello, RC, RR, cel. a, b, e c.[20]

 

Na ponderação hierárquica entre estes dois temas, é importante verificar que o registo melódico do tema do ripieno RR é mais agudo que o tema dos solistas RC. Esta confrontação temática tem, evidentemente, o propósito de valorizar o contratema RR de perfil mais complexo que o tema RC. Não se justifica, por isso, o deslocamento do tema dos solistas para oitava superior incluído em algumas edições da versão do Concerto para três violinos, pois resultaria, precisamente, no efeito oposto ao pretendido pelo compositor.

Este conjunto temático duplo que preenche os dois primeiros compassos inclui todo o material de células e motivos (RC, RR, a, b, c, d) que será utilizado e variado com inversões, diminuições e retrogradações em todo este primeiro andamento. Este bloco repete imediatamente a seguir na dominante (comps. 3-4), com uma pequena troca entre a linha temática RR dos vln I, agora apresentada pelos vln II, evoluindo o concertino em uníssono num desenvolvimento motívico de semicolcheias com utilização de células dos temas (em especial a célula b), incluindo outras variações de outras células, enquanto os vln I e vln II rematam com outro desenho temático em variação do motivo RR original (comps. 6-8).

 

image02

Exemplo 2: I. andamento, comps. 5-8.

 

Assim no ritornello, temos uma primeira parte temática (comps. 1-2) que repete na dominante (comps. 3-4) e que resolve com um pequeno desenvolvimento (comps. 5-9), desenhando um arco harmónico que passa pelas harmonias próximas, finalizando numa cadência perfeita na tónica (comps. 8-9), da qual abre a primeira entrada ao diálogo entre os solistas.

Neste primeiro momento em que o foco é atribuído ao diálogo solístico, surge no 1svln um curto tema (CS1, comps. 9-10) de ritmo pontuado com células do material temático. Mas, surpreendentemente, o tema inicial do concertino RC reaparece em simultâneo, agora no ripieno, com a indicação dinâmica de piano, ou seja, acompanhando o tema (CS1) e os contratemas (CCS1) do concertino. No compasso 10, o editor inclui nas vla a linha da mão esquerda do segundo cravo da versão 3Cbl.

 

image03

Exemplo 3: I. andamento, comps. 9-12, CS1, RC, ritornello.

 

Nos compassos 11-2, a recorrência do ritornello de todo o ensemble, com o RR e o RC na tónica, surge assim intercalada entre as entradas do tema CS1 do concertino, o qual apresenta a imitação à quarta inferior do CS1 e respectivos CCS1, curiosamente, em simultâneo com a repetição do RC, agora no ripieno, na dominante (comps. 13-14). Nesta edição, a linha da mão esquerda dos primeiro e segundo cravos da versão 3Cbl é incluída no primeiro dos vln II e na primeira vla.

 

image04

Exemplo 4: I. andamento, comps. 13-6.

 

De novo, a primazia é dada ao discurso solístico, agora num segmento ligeiramente mais prolongado (comps. 15-20), com os três violinos solistas trocando entre si sequências em sextas paralelas que descem por terceiras com a célula e a célula derivada do material do ritornello (três colcheias: duas repetindo a mesma nota, seguidas pelo salto de uma quinta descendente), associando-se ao basso continuo no acompanhamento das semicolcheias dobradas. Nos compassos 17-18, a célula aparece nos primeiros violinos com o salto descendente alterado para uma sexta, enquanto o baixo articula a nota pedal da tónica em saltos de oitava de colcheias. Simultaneamente, os três solistas juntam-se em uníssono num desenho idêntico aos compassos 4-5, adoptando a seguir a troca entre si da célula d. A linha de semicolcheias da mão esquerda do primeiro cravo da versão 3Cbl é aqui desenhada pelas violas, enquanto a linha de semicolcheias da mão esquerda do terceiro cravo aparece aqui no 2svln. Este bloco de animado diálogo entre solistas conclui-se nos compassos 20-1 com a cadência que modula à dominante.

 

image05

Exemplo 5: I. andamento, comps. 17-20.

 

Nos compassos 21-9, continua um novo segmento de linhas de solistas em simultâneo, em texturas de semicolcheias, introduzido com um compasso preenchido com escalas divergentes que fazem o regresso à tónica. Esta edição aproveita as escalas da mão esquerda dos segundo e terceiro cravo da versão 3Cbl incluindo-as na primeira viola e primeiro violoncelo. Segue-se uma troca de variações da primeira parte do tema CS1 entre os solistas (comps. 22-4, CS1 var) pontuadas com comentários nos vln I (motivo e), enquanto os baixos repetem a cabeça do tema RC.

 

image06Concerto for 3 violins BWV 1064R análise e performance half 25 8

Exemplo 6: I. andamento, comps. 21-8.

 

Na segunda metade do compasso 24 e compasso 25, enquanto o 2svln e o 3svln comentam com fragmentos de escalas ascendentes e descendentes, o 1svln destaca-se, primeiro, com uma linha de sequência de escalas (motivo ab), desenvolvendo depois para uma combinação de fragmentos de escalas seguidos de saltos de sextas (comps. 26-8, células f), regressando depois às sequências descendentes da célula (comp. 29), fazendo regressar de novo os solistas e o ripieno à primeira parte do ritornello na tónica (comps. 30-1).

 

image07

Exemplo 7: I. andamento, comps. 29-32.

 

Esta citação dá lugar de imediato à continuação do discurso do primeiro violino solista (comps. 31-9) em sequências de harpejos acompanhadas por uma subida cromática do baixo, e pontuadas pela partilha de fragmentos de harpejos e de fragmentos virtuosísticos nos restantes solistas (envolvendo nesta edição a primeira viola e a redistribuição do material pelos três violinos solistas), num arco harmónico que começa em Ré com sétima menor, a qual resolve para a sub-dominante Sol, pela dominante secundária Mi que resolve para a dominante em modo menor Lá, e, mantendo este padrão de sequência V-I, vai a Fá sustenido com sétima menor, resolvendo para si menor, mudando de seguida o padrão da sequência com Sol, Lá com sétima menor, a qual resolve para a tónica Ré, inflectindo ainda de novo à dominante secundária que resolve à dominante, numa preparação antecipada da cadência que fará regressar o ritornello na tónica (comps. 40-2).

 

image08a

image08b

image08c

Exemplo 8: I. andamento, comps. 33-43.

 

Assinale-se que este ritornello adiciona um compasso conclusivo à sua estrutura (comp. 42), procedendo a uma abordagem ao relativo Si menor, numa nítida diminuição da densidade contrapontística. Este efeito de distensão permite, precisamente uma nova fase de intervenções dos solistas, permitindo uma maior clareza na articulação entre o novo tema CS2 no segundo violino solista (comps.43-4), a linha secundária da mão esquerda do segundo cravo (3Cbl), aqui colocada no terceiro violino solista, e a linha do basso continuo. Esta nova série de diálogos entre os solistas prossegue com a imitação à quarta superiordo tema CS2 no primeiro violino solista, acompanhada pelas outras linhas secundárias distribuídas pelos restantes solistas, incluindo nesta edição a primeira viola, a qual desenha a linha da mão esquerda do segundo cravo (3Cbl). Contudo, no compasso 47, introduz-se uma quebra no ciclo de quintas, levando no compasso seguinte à abordagem do tema CS2 em Dó sustenido como dominante de Fá sustenido menor, no solista 3svln.

 

image09a

image09b

Exemplo 9: I. andamento, comps. 44-51.

 

A esta sequência segue-se uma nova série de imitações entre os solistas de um novo motivo (ca) em que são associadas a célula c (fragmento de harpejo) e a célula a (fragmento de escala) a partir da segunda metade do compasso 49, combinada com a descida em valores longos da célula a aumentada, acompanhada do basso continuo e de pequenos comentários nos primeiros e segundos violinos. Simultaneamente, a linha de contraponto de semicolcheias da mão esquerda dos terceiro e segundo cravo (3Cbl) é recuperada nesta edição, uma vez mais na primeira viola (comps. 49-51), a que se segue a imitação na linha dos baixos no compasso 52, tal como a versão 3Cbl, o que segue em linha com as opções editoriais de distribuição das linhas de contraponto solista para além do concertino. Este segmento culmina com os três solistas em uníssono a repetirem em sequência de quintas o motivo ca e o motivo (comps. 53-6). Nesta edição, optou-se por atribuir ao terceiro violino a linha da mão esquerda do primeiro cravo (3Cbl).

 

image10

Exemplo 10: I. andamento, comps. 52-5.

 

No segmento dos compassos 57-64, aparece combinada ou alternadamente material temático com contraponto livre no concertino, utilizando sobre tudo a célula a. Primeiro, o tema RC é apresentado na dominante no primeiro violino solo emparelhado com os primeiros e os segundo violinos, ao mesmo tempo que o tema de solista CS1 reaparece no segundo violino solista conduzindo à repetição do mesmo RC (comps. 59-60) em todos os naipes do ripieno, enquanto no concertino os solistas trocam entre si variações e imitações dos motivos já conhecidos.

 

image11a

image11b

Exemplo 11: I. andamento, comps. 56-63.

 

No compasso 61, estes diálogos contrapontísticos no concertino levam ao tema RC na tónica, agora em simultâneo no concertino e ripieno. Na segunda metade do compasso 63, voltam as variações no concertino que conduzem, desta vez, a uma sequência constituída por uma descida de mínimas em graus conjuntos nos primeiros violinos (comps. 65-8), enquanto no concertino, o terceiro violino solista faz reaparecer o tema CS2 e em sobreposição os restantes solistas desenham comentários com os motivos a e c.

 

image12a

image12b

Exemplo 12: I. andamento, comps. 64-71.

 

O tema RC regressa na sub-dominante no primeiro violino solista e nos violinos do ripieno, no compasso 70, a par do tema CS1 no terceiro violino solista. Do compasso 72 ao compasso 78, o concertino evolui numa passagem semelhante à passagem dos compassos 15-21, agora concluindo em Sol, a que se segue uma sequência (comps. 78-9) semelhante aos compassos 22-3.

 

image13a

image13b

Exemplo 13: I. andamento, comps. 72-9.

 

Esta recapitulação de material de segmentos anteriores continua com uma sequência (comps. 80-91) que culmina com outra progressão (comps. 91-9) com a recorrência do tema RC nas diferentes linhas em contraponto com um contratema CRC e um acompanhamento de um padrão que viria a ser conhecido como basso Alberti nos baixos.

 

image14a

image14b

image14c

image14d

image14e

Exemplo 14: I. andamento, comps. 80-99.

 

A partir da segunda metade do compasso 99 até ao compasso 102, regressa a sequência dos compassos 31-4, a que se segue (comps. 102-7) a recapitulação da sequência dos compassos 49-51 que conduz a uma linha cromática descendente de mínimas no primeiro violino solista e nos primeiros violinos do ripieno, descida que é interrompida no acorde de Sol sustenido diminuto, a partir do qual os solistas, dois a dois, desenham uma série de figurações virtuosísticas descendentes (comps. 107-9) de diminuições de tipo ornamental, respondidas por movimentos V-I pelo solista não envolvido no par e pelo ripieno.

 

image15a

image15b

image15c

Exemplo 15: I. andamento, comps. 100-11.

 

Esta sequência repete nos mesmos moldes nos quatro compassos seguintes (109-12), recrudescendo de tensão nos compassos seguintes com o concertino em uníssono em sequências com a célula a e com o motivo RR var na linha da mão esquerda do segundo cravo da versão 3Cbl, aqui atribuído à primeira viola, unindo-se todo o ensemble do concertino e do ripieno no compasso 114 com os motivos c e a.

 

image16a

image16b

Exemplo 16: I. andamento, comps. 112-9.

 

Este ponto culminante preparou a chegada da nota pedal dos compassos seguintes (115-9) onde o primeiro violino solista encarrega-se de manter a linha de semicolcheias contínua até ao compasso 120 onde retoma o motivo RC var, enquanto a nota pedal se dissipa.

 

image17

Exemplo 17: I. andamento, comps. 120-3.

 

Nestes compassos 120-2, a presente edição inclui nos violoncelos a linha da mão esquerda dos três cravos da versão 3Cbl. Esta sequência evolui com o terceiro violino solista com padrões de semicolcheias e os primeiro e segundo violino solistas com células de colcheias derivadas da cabeça do tema RC. Os solistas do concertino juntam-se de novo com os primeiro e terceiro violinos (comps. 125-127) emparelhados à sexta com células em diminuição, enquanto o segundo desenha variações das células triádicas já conhecidas, alternando depois o par com os segundo e terceiro violinos com o tema CS2 até ao compasso 132 onde o diálogo entre solistas termina na cadência à tónica para o regresso em pleno do ritornello completo (comps. 133-41).

 

image18a

image18b

image18c

image18d

image18e

Exemplo 18: I. andamento, comps. 124-41.

 

II. Adagio

O segundo andamento, Adagio, em Si menor, inicia-se com um bloco temático (comps. 1-4, RT) em que todos os elementos do ripieno trocam diálogos com fragmentos de escalas descendentes e ascendentes de semicolcheias, ligadas de duas em duas notas (motivos a, a inv), e comentários em ornatos de colcheias (motivo a’) por cima de um padrão na linha dos baixos.

 

image19

Exemplo 19: II. Adagio, comps. 1-3.

 

Este padrão base dos baixos será repetido oito vezes ao longo do andamento. Começa por abrir para a dominante (motivo b), regressando depois à tónica, através de um desenho descendente de semicolcheias (motivo b’) agrupadas em ligaduras de três e de duas notas. Com a cadência a si menor, o B.C. prossegue com o motivo b, acompanhando a entrada do concertino que surge com uma ideia temática no 1svln (CS1, comp. 4) à qual responde imediatamente o 2svln (CS1 var, comp. 5) em variações da mesma ideia, a que se junta ainda o 3svln (CS1 var, comp. 6) igualmente em variações de CS1.

 

image20

Exemplo 20: II. Adagio, comps. 4-6.

 

Neste primeiro momento do concertino, o contraponto utiliza diversos motivos, alguns livres, outros derivados dos motivos do ripieno, conduzindo à segunda entrada do bloco temático inicial do ripieno (comps. 9-12), agora no relativo maior. Definido o contexto harmónico relativo de Ré maior, regressa o concertino com novas variações motívicas, contra-motivos e imitações (CS2, CS2 var, CCS2, CS2’, comps. 12-5), agora em ordem de entrada inversa (3svln, 2svln e 1svln), acompanhados pelo B.C. com o motivo b. Nos compassos seguintes, enquanto o concertino continua os diálogos e imitações motívicas (CS2’, CS3[21]), regressa o ripieno RT, com a linha dos baixos de novo em Si menor (comps. 15-8).

 

image21a

image21b

image21c

image21d

Exemplo 21: II. Adagio, comps. 7-18.

 

Após esta confirmação da tónica, o B.C. oferece um enquadramento harmónico mais alargado para o concertino, apresentando o motivo b invertido (comps. 18-21). Simultaneamente, os três violinos solistas alargam o espaço do diálogo com a alternância de intervenções e imitações com os motivo CS3 e CS2’, combinados com mais uma recorrência do padrão do baixo (comps. 21-4), dando entrada ao bloco temático inicial RT (comps. 24-7), agora em Fá sustenido menor.

 

image22a

image22b

Exemplo 22: II. Adagio, comps. 19-24.

 

Depois deste bloco, reaparece o concertino agora em linhas paralelas simultâneas com cromatismos (CS4), recuperando as células de semicolcheias do motivo a, intensificando o sentido de indefinição tonal através da passagem sucessiva por harmonias de sétima diminuta (comps. 27-30).

 

image23a

image23b

Exemplo 23: II. Adagio, comps. 25-30.

 

A partir do compasso 31, enquanto o concertino continua a interacção melódica e contrapontística anterior, agora numa sequência do ciclo de quintas, os violinos e as violas do ripieno juntam-se em uníssono enunciando a primeira parte da linha dos baixos (comps. 31-3), culminando com o regresso dos próprios baixos com a segunda parte do padrão de semicolcheias descendentes, o qual termina no acorde de Sol sustenido diminuto, sobre o qual o movimento se interrompe com uma fermata cadencial curta (comp. 36).

 

image24a

image24b

Exemplo 24: II. Adagio, comps. 31-6.

 

Nos dois compassos seguintes, as fermatas sucedem-se, com os acordes de Mi sustenido sétima diminuta e Lá sustenido sétima diminuta.

 

image25a

image25b

Exemplo 25: II. Adagio, comps. 37-41.

 

Saindo deste momento disruptivo, o concertino volta primeiro às alternâncias entre si com o motivo CS3 (como nos compassos 18-21), cerrando de novo a textura contrapontística com imitações e o regresso dos motivos CS1 CS4, marcando a cadência do regresso à tónica com as sequências de semicolcheias dos baixos (comps. 38-44), passando o discurso conclusivo do andamento, por inteiro, para o ripieno o qual recapitula o bloco temático RT do início do Adagio (comps. 44-7).

 

image26a

image26b

Exemplo 26: II. Adagio, comps. 42-7.

 

III. Allegro

No bloco temático inicial do terceiro andamento (ritornello), a distribuição das linhas de contraponto recorre inúmeras vezes ao emparelhamento entre solistas e naipes do ripieno. A linha inicial dos baixos começa em Ré, descendo em graus conjuntos (motivo a), assemelhando-se particularmente com o primeiro andamento. Sobre esta linha, o 2svln e os vln II apresentam o tema principal constituído por uma linha ondulante ascendente em graus conjuntos (motivo b), enquanto o 3svln e as vla lançam uma espécie de contratema com um ritmo de semínimas, abrindo com uma quarta ascendente, seguindo depois com alternância de colcheias e semínimas, em estreito diálogo com o motivo a var do 1svln e dos vln I (comps. 1-10).

 

image27a

image27b

image27c

   Exemplo 27: III. Allegro, comps. 1-12.

 

Nos compassos seguintes, o concertino continua (CS1) com uma sequência de escalas virtuosísticas no 1svln, acompanhadas pelo 2svln, pelo B.C., com desenhos triádicos, e pelos baixos, numa espécie de “ponte” para a segunda entrada do bloco temático na dominante, a qual repete integralmente a mesma sequência de motivos, trocando, no entanto, as linhas que os enunciam, à excepção dos baixos (comps. 14-23).

 

image28a

image28b

image28c

Exemplo 28: III. Allegro, comps. 13-24.

 

concertino prossegue com variações e imitações motívicas (comps. 23-8, motivos CS2). O editor alargou esta interacção às vla, recuperando as linhas da mão esquerda dos cravos da versão 3Cbl.

 

image29

Exemplo 29: III. Allegro, comps. 25-8.

 

Subitamente, regressa a segunda parte do bloco temático (comps. 29-35), a qual conduz a mais uma entrada do mesmo bloco na tónica (comps. 35-42), mas onde o concertino e os vln I desenham o motivo b e b’ em uníssono, com o motivo a nos baixos. Nesta edição atribuiu-se a dobragem à sexta inferior do motivo b, bem como o motivo c da mão esquerda do cravo da versão 3Cbl às vla e aos vln II respectivamente (comps. 35-8).

 

image30a

image30b

image30c

Exemplo 30: III. Allegro, comps. 29-40.

 

A este momento de tutti mais compacto na tónica segue-se uma sequência de intervenções dos solistas aos pares alternados com linhas ascendentes de tercinas dobradas à décima e à sexta (comps. 42-8, CS3), conduzindo à sub-dominante e dando continuidade a um ritornello alterado, com uma interacção mais prolongada entre os solistas acompanhada pelo ripieno (comps. 48-59), a qual termina no relativo menor.

 

image31a

image31b

Exemplo 31: III. Allegro, comps. 41-8.

 

A partir do compasso 59, o 3svln desenvolve uma linha mais prolongada a solo (CS4), apenas acompanhada pelos baixos, com pontuações harmónicas esporádicas dos restantes solistas.

 

image32a

image32b

Exemplo 32: III. Allegro, comps. 57-64.

 

Recuperando o conjunto dos acordes dos cravos da versão 3Cbl, esta edição alarga estas pontuações aos naipes do ripieno e aos restantes solistas (comps. 59-65)A linha do solo do 3svln torna-se mais virtuosística depois do compasso 66 com rápidas escalas de semicolcheias.

 

image33a

image33b

Exemplo 33: III. Allegro, comps. 65-72.

 

Dado o interesse da interactividade entre esta linha e a da mão esquerda do cravo da versão 3Cbl, o editor atribuiu essa linha, igualmente virtuosística, à primeira vla (comps. 66-9). No compasso 70, partindo de Si menor, a intervenção do solista 3svln passa a focar uma sequência harmónica com a repetição de padrões virtuosísticos, acompanhada por uma longa linha de baixo em colcheias (comps. 70-9), passando por Fá sustenido menor, Dó sustenido menor, Fá sustenido com sétima menor, seguindo depois o ciclo de quintas, concluindo em Fá sustenido menor com a entrada do bloco temático no tutti, com o motivo a nos baixos, o motivo b nas vla e no 3svln (comps. 80-9). À semelhança do sucedido nos compassos 35-42, a este bloco segue-se de novo uma passagem em que os solistas dobram, e imitam o motivo ascendente das tercinas (CS3), numa transição modulatória que conduz à dominante da tónica original (comps. 89-100).

 

image34

Exemplo 34: III. Allegro, comps. 89-92.

 

Antecipando a proximidade do final do andamento, no compasso 102 o concertino lança mais uma prolongada intervenção virtuosística do 2svln (CS5). Valorizando uma vez mais a riqueza da textura harmónica e contrapontística da versão 3Cbl, nesta edição, a linha, igualmente virtuosística, da mão esquerda do cravo é desenhada pelo 3svln até ao compasso 110.

 

image35a

image35b

image35c

Exemplo 35: III. Allegro, comps. 101-12.

 

A partir do compasso 110, o solista desenvolve um tremolo modulatório, enquanto o B.C. retoma a linha rápida de colcheias que havia acompanhado o solo anterior (comps. 110-21), chegando à pedal da dominante.

 

image36a

image36b

Exemplo 36: III. Allegro, comps. 117-24.

 

Aqui, a linha do solista torna-se mais complexa (comps. 121-6), concluindo-se com a retoma do diálogo do tutti semelhante ao ocorrido nos compassos 23-9.

 

image37

Exemplo 37: III. Allegro, comps. 125-8.

 

Contudo, a partir do compasso 132 pode observar-se uma troca mais complexa das linhas do bloco temático do ritornello, com o motivo a nos vln I, no 1svln, e no 2svln com trilos, e ainda diminuído e invertido nas vla. O motivo b aparece nos baixos enquanto o motivo b’ surge nos vln II, 2svln e 1svln (comps.132-41).

 

image38a

image38b

Exemplo 38: III. Allegro, comps. 129-36.

 

Apesar da acumulação de tensão, surpreendentemente, um novo solo virtuosístico surge, agora no 1svln (CS6), agora com pontuações do ripieno mais assertivas que anunciam a premência da secção conclusiva do andamento.

 

image39a

image39b

image39c

Exemplo 39: III. Allegro, comps. 141-52.

 

Reforçando a riqueza da textura do concertino, o editor distribuiu o material da linha da mão esquerda do cravo da versão 3Cbl pelos restantes solistas (comps. 145-67). O solo evolui até à chegada da pedal na dominante, concentrando-se agora em harpejos de colcheias (mm. 162-8). Após várias alternâncias de escalas e harpejos em semicolcheias e colcheias, o 1svln chega a uma cadenza (comps. 168-75) preenchida com harpejos e sequências de células de colcheias ligadas duas a duas, numa acumulação de tensões que resolve com a recapitulação do ritornello inicial regressado à tónica.

 

image40a

image40b

image40c

image40d

image40e

Exemplo 40: III. Allegro, comps. 161-80.

 

Como remate final, nos compassos 188-92, a anteceder os acordes finais, regressam os solistas com o motivo das tercinas (CS3), sublinhando a complexidade da estrutura deste andamento.

 

image41a

image41b

Exemplo 41: III. Allegro, comps. 185-92.

 

Tal como no primeiro andamento, as texturas dos tutti e do concertino são profundamente explorados em termos de densidade harmónica e contrapontística. O editor considera esta uma experiência praticamente única no catálogo das obras conhecidas de Johann Sebastian Bach. Se na versão para 3 cravos 3Cbl, essa textura é, por vezes, difícil de realizar em termos de transparência, já no caso da presente edição para 3 violinos solistas, estão reunidas as condições para se atingir essa transparência, através de um meticuloso trabalho analítico que sustente a indispensável hierarquia entre as diferentes linhas, sendo esta a razão para disponibilizar ao intérprete esta análise mais detalhada.

 

 REFERÊNCIAS

[11]↵ELLER, Rudolf, HELLER, Karl, Johann Sebastian Bach, Neue AusgabeSämtlicher Werke, Serie VII/Band 6, Leipzig, VEB Deutscher Verlag für Musik & Kassel, Bärenreiter,1976, p. 61.

[12]↵Título atribuído ao director musical da escola da Igreja de São Tomás.

[13]BACH, Johann S., Konzert, C-Dur BWV 1064, D-B Am.B 68, manuscript copy by Bach’s pupil Johann Friedrich Agricola, Staatsbibliothek Zu Berlin – Amalienbibliothek, acedido em 3 de Fevereiro, 2021, https://www.bach-digital.de/receive/BachDigitalSource_source_00000434, 2021.

[14] Café Zimmermann em Leipzig.

[15] Netherlands Bach Society, «Bach’s most interesting concerto», in Concerto for three harpsichords in C major, site da NBS, 2018, https://www.bachvereniging.nl/en/bwv/bwv-1064/, acedido em 4 de Fevereiro, 2021.

[16] NBS, accessed on February 4, 2021.

[17]WOLLNY, Peter, «Violin Concertos», J. S. Bach Violin Concertos BWV 1041-1043, Concerto for three violins BWV 1064R, CD HMC902145, harmonia mundi, Freiburger Barockorchester, 2013.

[18]HUSCHER, Phillip, «Program Notes», Johann Sebastian Bach Concerto in C Major, BWV 1064 (arr. Koopman for flute, oboe, violin, and bassoon), Chicago Symphony Orchestra, 2006.

[19]ELLER, Rudolf, HELLER, Karl, Johann Sebastian Bach, Neue Ausgabe Sämtlicher Werke, 1976 (ver a nota 1), p. 63.

[20]Legenda: Temas – RC (ritornello-concertino), RR (ritornello-ripieno), RT (ripieno-tema), CS (concertino-solos), CCS (contra-concertino solos).

[21] De notar a relação directa entre este motivo CS3 e o motivo CS2 do primeiro andamento.

 

Quadro Analítico

Bibliografia



 

Analytical table/Quadro analítico

[For reading convenience, the adopted nomenclatures are in English/Por razões de conveniência de leitura, foram adoptadas as nomenclaturas em inglês]

Legend/Legenda:

  • · Themes/Temas – RC (ritornello-concertino), RR (ritornello-ripieno), RT (ritornelo-theme), CS (concertino-solos), CCS (counter-concertino solos).
  • · Others/Outros – 3Cbl (Concerto version for 3 Clavicembalo/Versão do Concerto para 3 Clavicembalo), var (variation),
  • · Parts/Partes – 1svln (Solo violino I), 2svln (Solo violino II), 3svln (Solo violino III), vln I & II, vla, B.C. (Basso continuo)

I. movement/andamento

 

I. movement

thematic material

instrumental

cells/motifs

measures

cadences/

harmonies

ritornello 1

mm. 1–9

RC

concertino

RC

a

b

c

d

1–9

I (D major)

mm. 8-9

cadence in I

RR

ripieno

RR

a

RR var

solos CS1

mm. 9–10

CS1

1svln

a

b

9–10

CCS1’

2svln

a

CCS1’’

3svln

a

b

RC

vln I

vln II

RC

a

b

3Cbl solo lines

vla

free

ritornello 2

mm. 11–2

RC

concertino

RC

a

b

11–12

RR

ripieno

RR

a

solos CS1

mm. 13–4

CS1

3svln

a

b

13–14

V

CCS1’

1svln

a

CCS1’’

vln II

a

b

RC

2svln

vln I

RC

a

b

3Cbl solo lines

solo vla

free

sequential

solos

1

mm. 15–29

sequence b & d

concertino

vln I

b

d

15–21

I – I

mm. 20-1

cadence in I

3Cbl solo lines

solo vla

B.C.

a

b

free

sequence CSI var

1svln

CS1 var

22–4

I – ii

comments

vln I

e

Baixos

Vc

Bass

RC var

sequence ab

concertino

ab

f

a

24–9

ii – I

ritornello 3

mm. 30–1

RC

concertino

RC

a

b

30 – 1

I

RR

ripieno

RR

a

sequential

solos

2

mm. 31–40

sequence cc

concertino

solo vla

c var

c

31 – 7

I – V

1svln solo

1svln

arpeggio

37 – 40

V – I

mm. 38-9

cadence in I

3Cbl solo lines

B.C.

bc

ritornello 4

mm. 40–2

RC

concertino

RC

a

b

40 – 2

I

RR

tuti

RR

a

sequential

solos

3

mm. 43–57

CS2

2svln

1svln

3svln

a

c

43 – 9

vi – iii

CCS2

3svln

2svln

CCS2

3Cbl solo lines

solo vla

free

sequence ca

concertino

ca

a

49–52

iii – iii

3Cbl solo lines

solo vla

b

a

sequence ca

unissono

concertino

ca

b

53–7

iii – V

3Cbl solo lines

solo vla

C

RR var

ritornello 5

& solos

1

mm. 57–64

RC

concertino

ripieno

RC

b

a

57–64

V, V, I

mm. 58-9

cadence in V

CS1

2svln

a

b

57–59

V

3Cbl solo lines

solo vla

free

sequential

solos

4

mm. 65–70

sequence CS2

3svln

CS2

65–70

IV – V

ritornello 6

& solos

2

mm. 70–9

RC

1svln

vln I

vln II

RC

a

70–1

IV

mm. 77-8

cadence in IV

CS1

3svln

b

a

3Cbl solo lines

solo vla

c

a

b

sequence b & d

concertino

solo vla

vln I

b

d

72–8

sequence CSI var

1svln

CS1 var

78–9

V, iii

comments

vln I

e

Bass

Vc

Bass

RC var

sequential

solos

5

mm. 80–133

sequence a & c

1svln

3svln

2svln

a

c

b

80–4

V – III7

sequence b & d

concertino

solo vla

vln I

b

d

cb

85–91

vi – iii

mm. 90-1

cadence in iii

sequence RC & CRC entries

concertino

solo vla

solo vln I

solo vln II

RC

CRC’

CRC’’

91–9

iii, VI, II, V, I, iv, V, I

Alberti bass

B.C.

Alberti bass

CS1 var

2svln

CS1 var

98–9

I

sequence c & a

concertino

ripieno

cc

c

ca

99–105

I7 – III

Bass

bass

ca

105–7

III – g#º7

Chromatic descent

1svln

chromatic descent

3Cbl solo lines

solo vla

c

sequence RR var

concertino

RR var

ca

107–12

I – IV

sequence a

solo 1svln

concertino

a

ca

c

112–20

IV – V

3Cbl solo lines

solo vla

RR var

sequence RC & RR & b

concertino

vln I

solo vla

RC var

RR var

b

120–2

V, ii, I

sequence c

concertino

ripieno

c var

123–8

I – V

sequence CS2

concertino

B.C.

CS2 var

b

a

128–33

V – I

mm. 132-3

cadence in I

final ritornello 7

mm. 133–41

RC

concertino

 

RC

a

b

c

133–41

I

 

 II. Adagio

 

II. Adagio

thematic material

instrumental

cells/motifs

measures

cadences/

harmonies

ripieno

thematic section

mm. 1–4

RT

ripieno

a, a’

b, b’

1–3

i (B minor)

concertino

solos

mm. 4–6

CS1

concertino

B.C.

CS1

CS1 var

b

4–8

i–III (relative)

ripieno

thematic section

mm. 9–12

RT

ripieno

a, a’

b, b’

9–11

III


oncertino

solos

mm. 12–8

CS2

concertino

B.C.

CS2

CS2 var

CCS2

b, b’

12–8

III–i

concertino

solos

mm. 18–24

CS3

concertino

B.C.

CS3

b inv

b

CS2’

b’

18–24

i–vi

ripieno

thematic section

mm. 24–7

RT

ripieno

a, a’

b, b’

24–7

vi

concertino

solos

mm. 27–36

CS4

concertino

B.C.

ripieno

CS4

CS3

b, b’

27–36

vi–g#º7

concertino

solos

mm.36–41

cadenzas

concertino

B.C.

ripieno

CS3

b

36–41

g#º7, e#º7, a#º7, F#7 (V)

concertino

solos

mm.41–4

CS3/4

concertino

B.C.

CS3

CS4

b

41–4

V–i

final ripieno

thematic section

mm. 44–7

RT

ripieno

a, a’

b, b’

44–7

i

 

 III. Allegro

III. Allegro

thematic material

instrumental

cells/motifs

measures

cadences/

harmonies

ritornello 1

mm. 1–10

RT

concertino

ripieno

a, a’, a var

b, b’

c, c’

1–10

I (D major)

concertino

solos

mm. 10–4

CS1

1svln

2svln

B.C.

CS1

b’

10–4

I–V

3Cbl solo lines

1vla

free

ritornello 2

mm. 14–23

RT

concertino

ripieno

a, a’, a var

b, b’

c, c’

14–23

V

concertino

solos

mm. 23–9

CS2

concertino

ripieno

CS2

23–9

V

3Cbl solo lines

1vla

CS2

ritornello 3 (part)

mm. 29–35

RT

concertino

ripieno

a var

b’

c’

29–35

V–I


ritornello 4

mm. 35–42

RT

concertino

ripieno

a

b, b’

c, c’

35–42

I

3Cbl solo lines

1vla

b

35–38

concertino

solos

mm. 42–8

CS3

concertino

ripieno

CS3

a var’’

42–8

I–vi (relative)

3Cbl solo lines

1vla

CS3

ritornello 5

concertino

solos

mm. 48–59

RT’

concertino

ripieno

free

b’

48–59

vi

concertino

solos

mm. 59–80

CS4 (3svln)

3svln

ripieno

B.C.

CS4

CS4’

CS4’’

59–80

vi–iii (F# minor)

3Cbl solo lines

1vln I

1vln II

1vla

chords

60–5

3Cbl solo lines

sharing ripieno lines

1vla

1svln

2svln

CS4’

chords

65–5

ritornello 6

mm. 80–9

RT

concertino

ripieno

a, a’, a var

b, b’

c, c’

80–9

iii–III

concertino

solos

mm. 89–101

CS3

concertino

ripieno

CS3

a var’’

a var’’’

b’

89–101

III–V

3Cbl solo lines

1vla

CS3

89–97

III–I

concertino

solos

mm. 101–26

CS5 (2svln)

2svln

B.C.

CS5

101–26

V

3Cbl solo lines

3svln

CS5

101–10

concertino

solos

mm. 126–32

CS2

concertino

ripieno

CS2

126–32

V

ritornello 7

mm. 132–41

RT

concertino

ripieno

b, b’

c, c’

a

132–41

V

concertino

solos

mm. 141–75

CS6 (1svln)

1svln

ripieno

CS6

CS6’

141–75

V–I

3Cbl solo lines

2svln

3svln

CS6

141–61

final ritornello 8

mm. 175–88

RT

concertino

ripieno

a, a’, a var

b, b’

c, c’

175–88

I

coda

mm. 188–92

CS3

concertino

ripieno

CS3

188–92

I

 


Bibliography/Bibliografia

Editions/Edições

manuscripts/manuscritos

BACH, Johann S., Konzert, C-Dur BWV 1064,  D-B Am.B 68 (manuscript copy by Bach’s pupil Johann Friedrich Agricola), Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin – Amalienbibliothek, acedido em 3 de Fevereiro/accessed on February 3, 2021, https://www.bach-digital.de/receive/BachDigitalSource_source_00000434, 2021.

Urtext

BACH, Johann S., «Concert, in C-Dur für drei Claviere», Bach-Gesellschaft Ausgabe, Band 31, Paul Waldersee (Ed.), Leipzig, Breitkopf und Härtel, 1885.

BACH, Johann S., Johann Sebastian Bach, Konzert für 3 Cembali und Streicher C-Dur, BWV 1064, Arnold Schering (Ed.), London, Ernst Eulenberg, 1923.

BACH, Johann S., «Johann Sebastian Bach, Konzert für drei Cembali, Streicher und Basso continuo C-Dur, BWV 1064», Neue Ausgabe Sämtlicher Werke, Serie VII/Band 6, Rudolf Eller & Karl Heller (Eds.), Leipzig, VEB Deutscher Verlag für Musik & Kassel, Bärenreiter, 1975.

reconstructed version for 3 violins/versão reconstruída para 3 violinos

BACH, Johann S., «Konzert für drei Violinen D-dur (nach BWV 1064)», Verschollene Solokonzerte in Rekonstruktionen - Neue Ausgabe Sämtlicher Werke, Serie VII: Orchesterwerke Band 7 (Supplement), Wilfried Fischer (Ed.), Leipzig, VEB Deutscher Verlag für Musik & Kassel, Bärenreiter, 1970.

 

Bibliographical references/Referências bibliográficas

ELLER, Rudolf, HELLER, Karl, «Johann Sebastian Bach, Konzert für drei Cembali, Streicher und Basso continuo C-Dur, BWV 1064», Kritischer Bericht von Rudolf Eller und Karl Heller - Neue Ausgabe Sämtlicher Werke, Serie VII/Band 6, Leipzig, VEB Deutscher Verlag für Musik & Kassel, Bärenreiter, 1976.

HUSCHER, Phillip, «Program Notes», Johann Sebastian Bach Concerto in C Major, BWV 1064 (arr. Koopman for flute, oboe, violin, and bassoon), Chicago Symphony Orchestra, 2006.

Netherlands Bach Society, «Bach’s most interesting concerto», in Concerto for three harpsichords in C major, site da NBS, 2018, https://www.bachvereniging.nl/en/bwv/bwv-1064/, acedido em 4 de Fevereiro/accessed on February, 4, 2021.

WOLLNY, Peter, «Violin Concertos: Concerto for three violins BWV 1064R », J. S. Bach Violin Concertos BWV 1041-1043, CD HMC902145, harmonia mundi, Freiburger Barockorchester, 2013.

Miguel Henriques is a pianist, conductor, scholar, and sought-after pedagogue with an international career that spans over four decades. Presently, he is the director of the Escola Superior de Música de Lisboa (Lisbon Music University).

Miguel Henriques performed on concert stages around the world in solo and collaborative recitals, as well as a guest soloist with major orchestras. His concerts have been documented in more than 160 videos and have been released in six commercial recordings and broadcasted in Radio and Television. More recently, he has devoted special attention to the repertoire for chamber orchestra, conducting the Camerata Gareguin Aroutiounian and producing adapted versions of works by different composers, especially J. S. Bach. He is also involved in many different music projects as artistic and cultural producer and promoter.

Professor Henriques holds a Graduate Performance Diploma from the prestigious Moscow State Tchaikovsky Conservatory, a Master’s Degree in Piano Performance from the University of Kansas, and a Ph.D. in Musical Arts from Universidade Nova de Lisboa. He was a disciple of Gleb Akselrod (Grigory Ginsburg pupil) and Sequeira Costa (Vianna da Motta pupil).

Since 1990, Miguel Henriques has been a Professor of Piano at the Escola Superior de Música de Lisboa, guiding a vibrant class of young pianists who have been developing successful international careers in music. He is regularly invited to teach masterclasses in major music schools and festivals.

Prof. Henriques wrote numerous specialized articles in several publications. Recently, he wrote the book “The (Well) Informed Piano – Artistry and Knowledge,” published by University Press of America.

 


 

Pianista, maestro, investigador e pedagogo, com uma carreira internacional que se estende por quatro décadas. Foi eleito como Director da Escola Superior de Música de Lisboa, cargo que ocupa desde 2015.

Miguel Henriques apresentou-se em recitais a solo, de música de câmara, como solista convidado de grandes orquestras. Muitas das suas apresentações estão documentadas em mais de 160 vídeos na Internet, tendo sido editados em seis CDs., e transmitidas na Rádio e Televisão. Mais recentemente, dedica especial atenção ao repertório para orquestra de câmara, dirigindo a Camerata Gareguin Aroutiounian e produzindo diferentes adaptações de obras de diferentes compositores, especialmente de J. S. Bach. A sua actividade abrange ainda a promoção e direcção artística de diversos eventos culturais.

Doutor em Artes Musicais pela Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Mestre pela Universidade do Kansas, nos Estados Unidos da América, Pós-Graduação pelo Conservatório Tchaikovsky de Moscovo, Diploma de Curso Superior de Piano do Conservatório Nacional e Diploma de Curso Geral de Piano do Conservatório de Música do Porto, Miguel Henriques foi discípulo de Gleb Akselrod (aluno de Grigory Ginsburg) e de Sequeira Costa (aluno de Vianna da Motta).

Desde 1990, Miguel Henriques é professor de piano na Escola Superior de Música de Lisboa, orientando uma classe vibrante de jovens pianistas que vêm desenvolvendo carreiras internacionais de sucesso. É regularmente convidado a orientar masterclasses nas principais escolas e festivais de música internacionais.

Miguel Henriques escreveu numerosos artigos especializados em várias publicações. Recentemente, foi publicado o seu livro "O Piano (Bem) Informado - Artistismo e Conhecimento", pela University Press of America.

          Logo IDICA horizontal 500px         

Todos os direitos reservados - Escola Superior de Música de Lisboa - CESEM - Pólo IPL | 2018